The London 2012 Olympic ticket designs have been launched. From the minute the 2012 Olympic logo was revealed, I was very curious to see how the collateral branding for the games would be handled. Whilst I’m still of the opinion that the chosen 2012 Olympic logo was designed to be controversial as opposed to being appropriate for the brief, I think that FutureBrand have created ticket designs that go some way towards balancing the need to stay true to the visual approach of the logo and branding of the games, whilst looking at least somewhat aesthetically appealing.
I’m particularly partial to the colours, the dynamic usage of the event pictograms, and the clever little logos used to display the venue type for the event, but unfortunately I think there are some obvious visual challenges presented by the designers’ attempts to incorporate visual references to the overall Olympic branding. The angled, gradient-heavy background shapes are visually distracting and seem to suggest harshness and rigidity, and there is no denying an obvious clash in the font used for the Olympic logo and the supporting text used for the ticket information.
Overall, the ticket designs do the job of being attention-grabbing and synonymous with the look established by the 2012 Olympic branding, but are ultimately a little too busy and are an example of the inevitable challenge that was always going to be posed by having such a bold and lary branding to incorporate.
- Adam
What do you think?

The London 2012 Olympic ticket designs have been launched. From the minute the 2012 Olympic logo was revealed, I was very curious to see how the collateral branding for the games would be handled. Whilst I’m still of the opinion that the chosen 2012 Olympic logo was designed to be controversial as opposed to being appropriate for the brief, I think that FutureBrand have created ticket designs that go some way towards balancing the need to stay true to the visual approach of the logo and branding of the games, whilst looking at least somewhat aesthetically appealing.

I’m particularly partial to the colours, the dynamic usage of the event pictograms, and the clever little logos used to display the venue type for the event, but unfortunately I think there are some obvious visual challenges presented by the designers’ attempts to incorporate visual references to the overall Olympic branding. The angled, gradient-heavy background shapes are visually distracting and seem to suggest harshness and rigidity, and there is no denying an obvious clash in the font used for the Olympic logo and the supporting text used for the ticket information.

Overall, the ticket designs do the job of being attention-grabbing and synonymous with the look established by the 2012 Olympic branding, but are ultimately a little too busy and are an example of the inevitable challenge that was always going to be posed by having such a bold and lary branding to incorporate.

- Adam

What do you think?

Microsoft’s latest “Productivity Future Vision” as spotted on ubelly.com. One very positive thing I think it demonstrates, is that technology should enrich experiences and interactions - not replace them. It’s quite exciting to think that the technology that we’re imagining in videos such as these, may well find its way into the hands of our children.

- Adam

One for the designers among us! Check out this brilliant new iPhone app by Santiago Zavala. Using the iPhone’s built-in camera, you can capture a colour palette of whatever you’re currently looking at, then share it via email, Twitter or Facebook. It even gives you the RGB and HEX values for the colours! I tested it on my tea cup and this was the result.
- Adam

One for the designers among us! Check out this brilliant new iPhone app by Santiago Zavala. Using the iPhone’s built-in camera, you can capture a colour palette of whatever you’re currently looking at, then share it via email, Twitter or Facebook. It even gives you the RGB and HEX values for the colours! I tested it on my tea cup and this was the result.

- Adam

Image 1: Mark working on his idea for some new wall art in the DJF Media studios at Farringdon.

Image 2: The result, introducing the DJF Media team!

Here’s the front window signage design made by our Creative Director Mark for our new office in Farringdon. What do you think?

Here’s the front window signage design made by our Creative Director Mark for our new office in Farringdon. What do you think?

Stefan Sagmeister is a great designer and even better public speaker. He has spoken at TED quite a few times. This is one of my favourites. In this video the great man shares moments from his life that have made him happy - which he discovered, involved great design.

- Adam

Our creative manager Miles found this beautiful work from Douglas Alves. An interesting fusion of photography, illustration and design. Check out more of Douglas’ work here.

Our creative manager Miles found this beautiful work from Douglas Alves. An interesting fusion of photography, illustration and design. Check out more of Douglas’ work here.

Hey there! We’re DJF Media…

We offer a wide range of bespoke multimedia services for businesses; ranging from video production, website development, online marketing, digital design, print and signage. But we also like finding cool things in the world of art, design, photography, music and video. We’ll share whatever we find here, and we hope you get inspired by it too!