The London 2012 Olympic ticket designs have been launched. From the minute the 2012 Olympic logo was revealed, I was very curious to see how the collateral branding for the games would be handled. Whilst I’m still of the opinion that the chosen 2012 Olympic logo was designed to be controversial as opposed to being appropriate for the brief, I think that FutureBrand have created ticket designs that go some way towards balancing the need to stay true to the visual approach of the logo and branding of the games, whilst looking at least somewhat aesthetically appealing.
I’m particularly partial to the colours, the dynamic usage of the event pictograms, and the clever little logos used to display the venue type for the event, but unfortunately I think there are some obvious visual challenges presented by the designers’ attempts to incorporate visual references to the overall Olympic branding. The angled, gradient-heavy background shapes are visually distracting and seem to suggest harshness and rigidity, and there is no denying an obvious clash in the font used for the Olympic logo and the supporting text used for the ticket information.
Overall, the ticket designs do the job of being attention-grabbing and synonymous with the look established by the 2012 Olympic branding, but are ultimately a little too busy and are an example of the inevitable challenge that was always going to be posed by having such a bold and lary branding to incorporate.
- Adam
What do you think?

The London 2012 Olympic ticket designs have been launched. From the minute the 2012 Olympic logo was revealed, I was very curious to see how the collateral branding for the games would be handled. Whilst I’m still of the opinion that the chosen 2012 Olympic logo was designed to be controversial as opposed to being appropriate for the brief, I think that FutureBrand┬áhave created ticket designs that go some way towards balancing the need to stay true to the visual approach of the logo and branding of the games, whilst looking at least somewhat aesthetically appealing.

I’m particularly partial to the colours, the dynamic usage of the event pictograms, and the clever little logos used to display the venue type for the event, but unfortunately I think there are some obvious visual challenges presented by the designers’ attempts to incorporate visual references to the overall Olympic branding. The angled, gradient-heavy background shapes are visually distracting and seem to suggest harshness and rigidity, and there is no denying an obvious clash in the font used for the Olympic logo and the supporting text used for the ticket information.

Overall, the ticket designs do the job of being attention-grabbing and synonymous with the look established by the 2012 Olympic branding, but are ultimately a little too busy and are an example of the inevitable challenge that was always going to be posed by having such a bold and lary branding to incorporate.

- Adam

What do you think?

One for the designers among us! Check out this brilliant new iPhone app by Santiago Zavala. Using the iPhone’s built-in camera, you can capture a colour palette of whatever you’re currently looking at, then share it via email, Twitter or Facebook. It even gives you the RGB and HEX values for the colours! I tested it on my tea cup and this was the result.
- Adam

One for the designers among us! Check out this brilliant new iPhone app by Santiago Zavala. Using the iPhone’s built-in camera, you can capture a colour palette of whatever you’re currently looking at, then share it via email, Twitter or Facebook. It even gives you the RGB and HEX values for the colours! I tested it on my tea cup and this was the result.

- Adam

Here’s a pretty damn cool example of the powerful effect of video. Add a bit of colour to your day with this video made for Summerdayze 2012 by Nick Thompson of The Drop Studio.